Frederick Rudolph

My Friendship with Fred Rudolph Fred Rudolph, the son of the manager of a Woolworths store in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania graduated from Williams in 1942. After the Army, he got his PhD from Yale. Williams obviously was on his mind. His thesis was Mark Hopkins and the Log. He returned to Williams in the first year of the American Civilization […]

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Anson Piper

Editor’s note: Professor Anson Piper, Williams ’40, taught at Williams for n years, and served as Chairman of the Romance Languages Department from 1960 to 1971. Jeffrey Brinn, who maintained a relationship with Piper and his family for many with his writes of his memories as an undergraduate and as a returning graduate. Anson Piper […]

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William McCormick

It was a bit of a shock and very sad to learn late last summer that Coach Bill McCormick passed away in July. He was a great influence on me during my four years at Williams, and I regret that I didn’t stay better connected after graduation. I saw him at a few reunions, most […]

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William B. Gates, Jr.

Yes, I admit it.  I took Economics 101 principally because I thought that some knowledge of the subject might one day help me get a job. But there were other reasons, too. I had grown up in a small town in the Ozarks hearing stories of the Great Depression of the 1930’s over dinner, and […]

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Fred Stocking

Perhaps Fred Stocking was not as passionate or flamboyant as Clay Hunt. Perhaps he did not possess the intimidating intellect of Charles Samuels. Nor did he command the immense treasury of knowledge of Don Gifford. I enjoyed my classes with each of those men. And Hunt and Samuels didn’t hesitate when I asked them to […]

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R. G. L. Waite

Editor’s note: we have two very different styles of tribute for Professor Waite. History major Bob Heiss was Waite’s student; Yani Counelis knew the man and his family intimately but never formally studied with him. We thank both authors for graciously sharing their work with us and for accommodating each other’s approaches and styles. Bob […]

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Jack Sawyer, the Visionary President We Hardly Knew

President John Sawyer was a distant figure to most of us, the more so because he was not the best of public speakers and seemed to have a certain reserve in gatherings. It was rather paradoxical, really, on a campus where the Mark Hopkins ideal of professors and students engaging in lively discussion in a very personal educational process was the norm.

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